How to Take Ideas from Concept to Creation

Have you ever come across a product or service that you had the idea for months or years ago?  Perhaps that frustrated you since you had the idea first and yet someone else is earning profits on your idea!

This happens often and makes one thing very clear – ideas are cheap.  Anyone can have an idea; what separates us from the person who is now profiting off the idea is execution.  That is, they took that idea from concept to creation.  I have spent the better part of the last 4 years, facilitating and teaching audiences all around the world how to take ideas from concept to creation.  I break the mission down into four steps, which I will describe below.

C2C Process

Identify the Problem – For any idea to become a viable and sustainable solution, it must address a real problem faced by a specific group of people.  The problem is also known as the market.  Without a market, a solution will not succeed, as it will not actually solve anything worthwhile.  In order to prepare your idea for the next step, it is critical that you: determine the problem you are intending to solve, the audience you intend to solve it for, and how/when the problem is currently measured/noticed.  The following are 5 questions to help guide you through your research.  For additional and deeper questions, read my article, 30 Questions to Help You Identify the Problem.

  • What is the problem as you currently know it? Describe a specific situation (include the people and stakeholders involved and their role/experience)
  • What job or task was the person suffering the problem attempting to accomplish, when the problem happened?  Learn more about Jobs to be Done Theory.
  • How did the person know the problem was happening or happened? Or did the person not even know?  (this opens an interesting possibility)
  • How is the success of the attempted job or task measured?
  • What does the problem cost to any or all of the stakeholders involved in the problem?

Validate Your Findings – All of the work you did in the first step helped you establish a collection of hypotheses related to the problem, however, this must be verified through first hand investigation and data collection.  While you may be absolutely certain that your problem statement is correct, it is almost a certainty that you are not 100% accurate.  Validation of your problem, through surveys, observations, experiments, and interviews, will help you refine the problem ahead of beginning the design of a solution.  Your problem may be made up of 10, 15, or 20 hypotheses; set up surveys, observations, experiments, or interviews, accordingly to confirm each one.  Once you have all of the results, update and finalize your problem statement.  Consider the following questions in your effort to validate the problem.

  • Are the problem stakeholders you identified actually connected to the problem? If not, did you have too many or not enough?
  • Would the person suffering from the problem consider the problem “painful” enough to warrant a solution? Is the job or task they are attempting important enough?
  • What evidence do you have to support the estimates for the problem or opportunity cost?
  • If the problem is one that no one is aware of, how can you verify it is worth solving?

Solution (re)Design – Let’s be honest, you already had the solution in your mind before you began investigating the problem thoroughly.  Thus, with a validated problem in hand, you will need to design or re-design the solution to address the specific elements of problem.  For this step, design a solution that does no more and no less than what the problem calls for.  Product-Market fit is critical to resonating with potential customers/users.  Build too much solution and your customer sees it as too complicated.  Build too little solution and your customer is left having to find the remainder of the solution elsewhere.  Consider the following questions in your solution (re)design.

  • How does your solution allow the user to complete the intended job or task?
  • Which features of your solution address which features of the problem? Are there extra features?  Or not enough?
  • How much does the solution cost in relation to the cost of the problem?
  • In what measurable ways does the solution improve/solve the problem? (refer to problem metrics)
  • In what measurable ways does the solution complicate the job or task of the user?
  • Conduct a cost/benefit analysis of the complications versus improvements.

Design a Sustainability Model – Solutions that are meant to solve problems for people other than yourself must have a way of surviving on their own.  That is, they must have a model for sustaining themselves in the market.  This is absolutely critical if you plan to scale your solution to reach ever increasing users.  Consider the following elements when designing your own sustainability model.

  • Target customer segments (distinguish between user and customer, if applicable)
  • Value proposition for each customer/user segment, what are they?
  • Pricing strategies and models, what are they?
  • Fixed and variable cost elements, what are they? (focus on the big ones first)
  • Distribution channels and methods, how will you get this into the hands of the customer?
  • Competition, who are they, how do they compete with your solution?
  • Customer acquisition, how will you find and secure customers?

Take this process and run your idea through it.  Spent most of your time on the problem.  Solutions are easier to design when the problem is understood clearly, comprehensively, and deeply.

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3 Steps for Building a High Performance Team

Successful businesses do well because of their amazing teams, not their products and services.  Many of us will probably agree that people and teams are the most valuable asset any business possesses and also your most critical competitive advantage.  Rowing Team - HPTUltimately, ideas can be copied, modified, and upgraded.  However, it is difficult to copy teams and/or steal them (well, most of the time).  Furthermore, a well-functioning team is more productive and efficient and thus delivers more value and output for the same money.  However, this is all a moot point if you are not unleashing the power of your team.  If your team is not producing and performing at its best, you are not enjoying these benefits and are susceptible to competition.  This puts you in a position to have to fight competition in more dangerous (i.e. costly, detrimental, etc.) battlefronts like pricing and advertising.

Barcelona Team

A great example of a high performing team.

Building and developing a high performing team requires many important ingredients.  However, there is one fundamental element that forms the foundation for high performing teams and that is clear and concise objectives and roles.  To use a sports metaphor, consider one of the most high performing soccer teams in the world, FC Barcelona.  They are very clear about their objectives (i.e. hold the ball, control the flow of the game, take high percentage shots).  For the record, not all soccer teams have the same objectives.  They also have clearly defined roles and operational strategies for how they execute their objectives.  For a better understanding of what this looks like in action, click on the image of the team for a short video.  You can see from the video how their team looks like a thinking and breathing organism of its own.  It’s not about one person.  It’s about an entire team coming together.

The following is a list of steps necessary to ensure you too have a strong foundation from which to develop your high performance team.

1.  Design and consistently communicate clear and concise business objectives.  This typically begins with the vision of the organization – a clear picture of what, where, and how the business will look, feel, and operate at some point in the future.  The vision also includes what the environmental context will look, feel, and operate like in the future.  In other words, this is the future that the organization is running after.  Next comes the mission.  This will clearly communicate “how” your business will run toward the vision.  From the mission, come your specific objectives.  The more clear the vision and mission are, the more easily you can create, communicate, and evaluate objectives for the business.  These clear and concise objectives are critical to the foundation of high performing teams because it gives way to the next important step.

2.  Design the operational strategy, plan, and processes that will define how the business operates in order to achieve its objectives and execute its mission on a consistent basis.  Imagine your business as a thinking and breathing organism.  When you design your business operations strategically, your business takes on a life of its own.  This has many benefits from a competitive and operational perspective.  Competitively, it is difficult to copy or steal an entire operations strategy and process.  Operationally, it means that the business does not rely solely on people like the owners or top executives to operate successfully.  Instead, the leaders can focus on doing what they are supposed to do – lead – while the business is positioned to operate efficiently and effectively on its own.  With this strategy and plan in mind, you are now ready to begin the next critical step.

3.  Design clearly defined and concise roles that support your operational strategy.  With your operational strategy, plan, and processes, you now have what you need to design the most effective roles for your organization.  These roles will be the ones necessary to maintaining the operation and if clearly defined and communicated, your team will have a deep understanding of the essential role they play within your operational context.  Furthermore, when roles are designed clearly and fit effectively into an operational context, it significantly reduces friction (i.e. employee stress, operational inefficiencies, miscommunication, etc.) in the business.

Equipped with this strong foundation, you can begin to build and develop your high performance team.  This insight is just as important for a three-person company as it is for a 20,000-person organization.  Two weeks ago, I was coaching a startup company that was suffering from some friction and we realized it was due to a lack of clearly defined objectives and roles.

Leaders from successful startup businesses, with anywhere between 2-10 employees, all the way to Fortune 100 companies like General Electric (specifically during the Jack Welch era) have leveraged this framework for building and developing powerful teams.

Start by evaluating your vision, mission, and objectives.  Then look at your business-wide operational strategy to ensure it lives and breaths to accomplish the objectives and execute on your mission.  Finally, take a look at the roles in your organization to ensure you have all of the right people on the bus and sitting in the right seats.